04 07 2014 10 00

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First test of QUEEN ELIZABETH galley

HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH achieved a major milestone this week as a team of 26 Royal Navy chefs came together to test the galley equipment on board. For the first time, the state of the art galley was fired up and meals were prepared to the test the equipment and innovative systems designed into the five dining spaces which will feed the ships company when the ship enters service.

A menu, specifically designed to facilitate thorough testing of the capacity, flow, design and practicability of the galley, was created for a lunch time session. Industrial and Royal Navy colleagues were served lunch by the chefs. The training opportunity allowed the chefs to test the ovens, deep fat fryers, ranges and grills.

The bakery and the preparation areas were also put to good use and the coppers were used to boil water. The trial run was successful and puts the chefs and equipment in good stead for the when the ship’s company are served their first meal on board early next year.

Spirit of the Alliance

Spirit of the Alliance is a lasting legacy for all those who have contributed to the construction of the Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers.

The Aircraft Carrier Alliance recognises that without the determination and commitment from everyone involved over the years we would not have these two tremendous vessels nearing completion.

If you have been involved in the construction of the carriers you can have your contribution recognised by having your name displayed in a location on board HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH and HMS PRINCE OF WALES for the next 50 years. These nameplates will be a permanent tribute to the men and women who have been involved in this national endeavour. Wherever these flagships sail they will bear testament to the pride everyone has taken in delivering nation’s flagships.

How it will work

Being Europe’s biggest defence project, the number of people who have worked on the programme goes into the tens of thousands. Nevertheless, we want to capture all of these names, both past and present. If you have worked on the programme for at least 12 months since the year 2000 please email spiritofthealliance@baesystems.com with the below details.

Start date (month and year)
Finish date (month & year)
Parent Company    
Clock or Staff No.
Supervisors Name

All information provided will be checked against employee records.

If you require any further information please contact spiritofthealliance@baesystems.com.
HRH Prince Charles places the final section of HMS Prince of Wales

The second of the largest warships ever built for the Royal Navy, the Queen Elizabeth Class carrier HMS PRINCE OF WALES, was given the royal seal of approval when HRH The Prince of Wales, (or Duke of Rothesay as he is referred to in Scotland), visited Babcock’s Rosyth Facilities and signalled for the final section to be lowered into place.

The 570-tonne block – known as Sponson 11 – was the final section of the 280-metre-long warship to be manufactured. In an historic moment, HRH Duke of Rothesay gave the order for the massive section, which includes part of the flight deck, to be lowered into place by the Goliath crane. This allows the final welding to start in order to make the carrier structurally complete.

Ian Booth, Managing Director of the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, said: “By the end of July we will have finished welding the final section together and the ship will be structurally complete, thanks to the commitment, skills and experience of the Alliance workforce. The team will now embark on the next phase of the ship’s construction. This involves extensive outfitting, testing and commissioning of her propulsion and mission systems, as the ship is brought to life. The ship will then start her harbour trials here in Rosyth before setting off for sea trials in 2019.”

John Howie, Chief Executive – Marine & Technology Division, Babcock International, and a member of the Aircraft Carrier Alliance’s Management Board, said: “This moment marks the end of eight years of manufacturing for the Queen Elizabeth Class programme at our six shipyards across the UK. I know I speak on behalf of more than 10,000 workers who have contributed to the design and build of the Queen Elizabeth Class carriers when I say we are honoured to have HRH Duke of Rothesay here to mark this important occasion.”

Captain Ian Groom MBE, Senior Naval Officer for HMS PRINCE OF WALES, said: "We were delighted to have HRH Duke of Rothesay here today to mark such a significant milestone in the life of the ship, drawing the construction phase of the Royal Navy's second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier to a close. The focus now moves to commissioning the ship and my team will continue to work with their industry partners to bring her to life ahead of sea trials."

HMS PRINCE OF WALES will be delivered off contract in 2019.

For imagery, please view this link: https://resources.baesystems.com/?c=27476

Unique Thermal Metal Coating Developed for Royal Navy’s Newest Aircraft Carriers

An innovative thermal metal coating has been developed specifically by British companies to protect the flight deck of the Queen Elizabeth Class Aircraft Carriers from the heat which results from the immense thrust of the engines of the new F-35B Lightning II fighter jets.

Specialist teams from across the Aircraft Carrier Alliance have developed the unique protective coating capable of resisting the high temperature exhaust gases emitted by the new F-35B Lightning II aircraft during its short take-off and vertical landings.

Using a combination of aluminium and titanium, the thermal metal coating can withstand temperatures of up to 1,500°C (2,700°F). The coating, developed in partnership with Monitor Coatings based in Tyne and Wear, is expected to provide long-term protection through the life of the carriers and forms an important part of the work underway to prepare HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH for sea trials next year and flight trials in 2018.

Ian Booth, Managing Director of the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, said: “There is incredible momentum behind the programme to prepare HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH for sea trials and integrate the F-35B Lightning II aircraft. Working with experts in the UK, we have developed a unique coating to provide the necessary protection to the flight deck of the aircraft carriers and this will ensure they can deliver the UK’s carrier strike capability for the next fifty years.”

Captain Simon Petitt, Senior Naval Officer of HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH, said: "The new flight deck coating is one of the many 21st Century engineering innovations being incorporated in the Queen Elizabeth Class programme. As the largest warships ever built for the Royal Navy, these powerful ambassadors will protect UK interests around the globe for the next 50 years."

The specialist thermal coating is being applied to sections of the vast flight deck of HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH using a specially developed robotic spray, which fires powdered metal through a jet of plasma at temperatures of almost 10,000°C (18,000°F). The molten droplets then flatten and quickly solidify, creating a tough but rough coating 2-2.5 mm thick that is bonded to the steel beneath. Approximately 2,000 square metres of the 19,000 square metre flight deck will be coated, with the work due to be completed prior to sea trials in early 2017.

First Compartments of Flagship Handed Over to Ship's Crew

The Aircraft Carrier Alliance has successfully signed over the first compartments of HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH to her crew, over a year ahead of when the ship is due to be delivered to the Royal Navy.

The six large compartments are the first sections of the ship the crew has taken ownership of and marks an important step towards delivering the nation's flagship.

The compartments are part of the dry storage areas for the catering teams and will be used to train the ship’s company in damage control including fire-fighting, flood and medical emergencies. Over the longer-term the catering teams will also use these compartments to train their people in using stores equipment, such as the portable electric transporters and lifts.

Allan Smith, the lead of this area of the ship, said: “This is a very proud day for everyone in the Alliance. There have been hundreds of people in every conceivable trade working on these compartments – from the time they were a part of Lower Block 03 being built in Glasgow to the fit-out and commissioning phases here in Rosyth.

“Compartments would normally be handed over after sea trials, so to achieve this at such an early stage, to the high quality and specification required by the Royal Navy, is a very significant milestone for the team.”

Lieutenant Commander John Ball, of the ship’s company, said: “Having the capability to start our damage control training on-board the ship so early is extremely exciting and will save us a vast amount of time. It will help us accelerate our learning opportunities and go some way to make sure our people are ready to operate the ship ahead of sea trials.

“While we could undertake similar training on-board other ships, there’s nothing like training on the actual vessel you’ll sail on as we learn the specialist techniques required to operate such a large and complex warship.”

Minister of State for Defence Procurement, Philip Dunne, said: “The UK’s new aircraft carriers are impressive feats of engineering, brought to life by the best of British shipbuilding skills. This latest milestone marks the demonstrable progress being made in the progressive handover of HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH to the Royal Navy crew, allowing them to conduct vital training before taking this state-of-the-art vessel to sea.

“The carriers, supported by our £178 billion investment in equipment for our Armed Forces, will spearhead Britain’s sea power for the next five decades, protecting UK interests both at home and abroad.”

The carriers will be the centrepiece of Britain’s maritime capability. Each 65,000 tonne aircraft carrier will provide the armed forces with a four acre military operating base, which can be deployed worldwide. The vessels will be versatile enough to be used for operations ranging from supporting war efforts to providing humanitarian aid and disaster relief.

HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH and HMS PRINCE OF WALES are being delivered by the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, a unique partnering relationship between BAE Systems, Thales UK, Babcock and the Ministry of Defence. A national endeavour, at its peak the programme directly employed 10,000 people across six build yards. While manufacturing and commissioning is now solely focussed in Rosyth, the skilled and diverse workforce is sourced from across the country, including many from BAE Systems in Glasgow and Frimley.

For imagery please use this link: https://resources.baesystems.com/?c=26962&k=08b655f7f1

Proud to support Scottish Apprenticeship Week

Shaun McAllister, 22 has been a fabricator apprentice at Babcock’s Rosyth facilities since May 2015 and will finish his apprenticeship in April 2016. He started his apprenticeship with a local steel fabrication company.

Shaun said: “I love the variety of my job and the fact that I get to do a bit of everything. It’s a great environment to work in at Rosyth, as the managers really look after the apprentices. My typical day involves putting my overalls and PPE on and then at 07:30, my manager gives me a job sheet. If it’s a complex job, we will talk through the job together to find the best way of doing it, but if not, I just work away until the job’s complete and then move on to the next one.

I worked on HMS Queen Elizabeth when I first started at Rosyth, and I’m now working on the sponsons for HMS Prince of Wales, which has been really good experience. With the aircraft carriers, you can see the final product of everything you’re working on and it’s great to be a part of such an important project - it gives you a real sense of pride in what you’re doing.

When I was working on HMS Queen Elizabeth, I did things like fit penetrations, wash off pads and put on pipe and seat supports. My favourite job on HMS Prince of Wales so far has been fitting the units. Myself and a few others have fitted three or four of them – it was really rewarding afterwards because we had built a section of the ship ourselves.

The team working on the carriers, from the managers to other senior staff, is brilliant. If you ever need a hand with a job, any one of them is willing to help you and they’re all really friendly. I want to go as far as I can with the company and take advantage of all the opportunities that it offers.

I’m also a member of the Health and Safety forum at Rosyth, which is a really good thing for apprentices to get involved in, as it opens your eyes to safety hazards that you might not otherwise see.

My advice to other people looking to do an apprenticeship is to be keen, because you will only get out of it what you’re willing to put in. Be here to better yourself and your future.”

Royal Name for Carrier Jetty

The jetty, currently known as Middle Slip Jetty, is being strengthened and upgraded to support the carrier which is due to arrive in Portsmouth in early 2017.

Naval Base Commander, Commodore Jeremy Rigby, said: “We are delighted that Her Majesty The Queen has agreed to the Royal Navy’s request to rename the jetty. The Princess Royal, as Commodore-in-Chief for Portsmouth, is a frequent visitor to the base and takes a keen interest in all of our activities here.

“It also sends an important message that the Naval Base is moving into a new and exciting era.  There is a step change in the way that we support and operate our ships compared to yesteryear.”

It is hoped The Princess Royal will formally name the jetty in a ceremony towards the end of the year. HMS Queen Elizabeth and her sister ship HMS Prince of Wales are the biggest and most powerful warships ships ever built for the Royal Navy.

HMS PRINCE OF WALES' Aft Island lifted into place

The Aircraft Carrier Alliance successfully lifted one of the final sections of the second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier in Rosyth on Friday 8 January following its arrival from Glasgow.

The 750 tonne block was raised 25 meters in the air using the Goliath crane and placed on the deck of HMS PRINCE OF WALES, bringing assembly work on the ship significantly closer to completion.

This section to be assembled is known as the Aft Island and will control aircraft operations aboard HMS PRINCE OF WALES. Its journey from Glasgow, where it was constructed, took it 1,335 miles around the south coast of England in order to reach its destination in Fife.

Angus Holt, HMS PRINCE OF WALES Delivery Director, said: “This is a significant day for everyone working for the Alliance and there’s a real sense of excitement to see this important section being assembled on to the ship. With the second island positioned on the flight deck of HMS PRINCE OF WALES the scale of the engineering and construction task that the Aircraft Carrier Alliance is undertaking is clearly visible.

“Thanks to the dedication of thousands of workers across the country we are proud to be delivering this critical capability to the Royal Navy.”

Defence Minister, Philip Dunne, said: "The final section of HMS PRINCE OF WALES being put in place marks a huge achievement for the thousands of highly skilled people across the UK that have contributed to the construction of what will be the UK's largest aircraft carriers.

"Supported by a £178 billion equipment budget, the carriers - along with our new Lightning II aircraft, which we are buying more quickly - will provide the spearhead of the UK's military capability for the next 50 years, keeping the nation safe at home and protecting our interests abroad."

As the 750-tonne island settled onto the flight deck, it sealed into place a plaque positioned underneath it. This contains the emblems of the Royal Navy, Royal Air Force and Army. The plaque was handed over to the Aircraft Carrier Alliance by Rear Admiral Henry Parker and will remain part of the fabric of the warship for its entire life.

The second of the Queen Elizabeth Class Carriers, HMS PRINCE OF WALES, will be structurally complete by mid-2016 and will be handed over to the Royal Navy in 2019 with Initial Operating Capability in 2023.

The Queen Elizabeth Class are the first aircraft carriers in the world to use an innovative twin-island design. The Aft Island is responsible for the ship’s mission systems and acts as an aircraft control tower. The Forward Island contains the bridge and is primarily responsible for the command of the ship. While each island has a primary role, both are able to incorporate the other’s role in an emergency, increasing the survivability of the ship.

The carriers will be the centrepiece of Britain’s maritime capability. Each 65,000 tonne aircraft carrier will provide the armed forces with a four acre military operating base, which can be deployed worldwide. The vessels will be versatile enough to be used for operations ranging from supporting war efforts to providing humanitarian aid and disaster relief.

HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH and HMS PRINCE OF WALES are being delivered by the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, a unique partnering relationship between BAE Systems, Thales UK, Babcock and the Ministry of Defence. A national endeavour, at its peak the programme directly employed 10,000 people across six build yards. While manufacturing and commissioning is now solely focussed in Rosyth, the skilled and diverse workforce is sourced from across the country, including many from BAE Systems in Glasgow and Frimley.

For imagery please use this link: https://resources.baesystems.com/?c=26656&k=1b31db6db7

For timelapse footage use this link: https://youtu.be/o2FMLZlR6LY

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